HOT ITEMS:  World Series Team Gear  -  Vintage Baseball Jackets   -  Minor League Gear  -  MLB Memorabilia / Collectibles  -  Fathead MLB Graphics
ProRank International
Baseball Services

Baseball  Statistics Index

Online Services for Sport, Health, and Fitness Fantastic Offers on Fan Gear at FansEdge!

MLB Baseball Gear

Baseball Equipment

Sports Memorabilia

Fantasy Projections

MLB Screensavers

Baseball Posters

Baseball Tickets

Baseball Jobs

Baseball
Scouting
Player
Profiling
Fantasy
Rotisserie
Baseball
Gear
Books
Videos
Games
Software
Baseball
Posters
Baseball
News
Other
Sports
More
Info
   
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z    

Baserunners-per-inning (also WHIP or Ratio): Walks + hits divided by the number of innings pitched. This is a traditional rotisserie scoring category.  Less than 1.25 is considered very good and more than 1.50 is considered very bad.  Values under 1.00 indicate that the pitcher has allowed fewer baserunners than innings pitched and are only achieved occasionally by elite MLB pitchers.

Batting Average: The classic measure of batting proficiency.  Defined as hits divided by at-bats.  Although it is a standard rotisserie scoring category,  many analysts believe it is an imperfect measure of offensive ability because it neglects the offensive value of walks and assumes that all hits are equal.

Batting Eye (also Eye): Defined as walks divided by strikeouts and considered to be a good measure of a player's strike zone judgment.   The very best MLB hitters have batting eye ratios over 1.00.  Eye ratios of less than 0.50 are indicative of a free-swinging approach to hitting and poor strike-zone judgment.  Players with eye ratios of .70 or better have a greater probability of maintaining a high batting average than players with eye ratios of .50 or less.

BB@9 (also Walks-per-game):  Defined as (walks allowed divided by innings pitched) x 9.   This is an index of how much control a pitcher has. Values below 3.0 indicate very good control; values above 4.0 suggest problems with control.


Eye (also Batting Eye):  Defined as walks divided by strikeouts and considered to be a good measure of a player's strike zone judgment.   The very best MLB hitters have batting eye ratios over 1.00.  Eye ratios of less than 0.50 are indicative of a free-swinging approach to hitting and poor strike-zone judgement.  Players with eye ratios of .70 or better have a greater probability of maintaining a high batting average than players with eye ratios of .50 or less.


Homeruns-per-game (also HR@9):  Defined as (home runs allowed divided by innings pitched) x 9.  An index of a pitcher's ability to keep the ball in the park.  It is impacted by ability factors as well as park factors and is often inflated for low-WHIP-but-high-ERA pitchers.  A rough rough division between good and not-so-good performance is 1.0.

HR@9 (also Homeruns-per-game):  See previous definition.


K@9 (also Strikeouts-per-game): Defined as (strikeouts divided by innings pitched) x 9.  This is a measure of a pitcher's dominance over hitters and is a key diagnostic stat.  It is especially useful for evaluating relief pitchers and, in particular, closers.  The better MLB pitchers will have k@9 values of 6.0 or more, and good closer candidates usually have values above 8.0.

K@BB (also Strikeout-to-walk ratio):  Defined as strikeouts divided by walks allowed, this statistic measures a pitcher's ability to: (1) throw strikes and, at the same time, (2) keep hitters from getting the bat on the ball.  A key diagnostic stat for all pitchers but especially for SPs.  The best MLB pitchers have k@bb ratios over 3.00.  Pitchers with k@bb ratios below 1.00 walk more batters than they strike out and should be avoided on fantasy/rotisserie rosters.


LAG (also Performance Lag):  An index that reflects the gap (i.e., lag) between a player's expected statistical output and his actual statistical output.  The lag can occur for many reasons, but some of the more common reasons are lack of playing time, injury, and late-call-ups.  High LAG ratings essentially mean "This player should be putting up better stats in my scoring categories than he is currently putting up", and they are therefore an excellent way of identifying "sleepers" for draft purposes or free agent bids.  Players who have solid batting averages and good on-base ability but, at the same time, below-average HR and/or SB output also tend to get good LAG rankings.  These players make excellent end-game and/or reserve picks because of their steady-but-unspectacular performance.

LIMA Plan: A rotisserie team management strategy that targets low-cost pitchers with high TOOLS ratings, thereby freeing up dollars for offense. The strategy was developed by Ron Shandler who used the term LIMA as an acronym for Low Investment Mound Aces. Implementation of the strategy involves: (a) allocating roughly 25% of the total salary budget for pitching; (b) using no more than half of that 25% in an effort to acquire saves; (c) assembling the remainder of the pitching staff from players who have k@9 values of 6.0 or higher and have k@bb values of 2.0 or higher and have hr@9 values of 1.0 or less; and (d) using the remaining 75% of the salary budget to assemble an offense that will rank near the top of every batting category.

Linear Weights (also LINWGT):  Discussed by Thorn and Palmer in Total Baseball, this is essentially a regression equation designed to estimate a hitter's run production capabilities or a pitcher's run prevention capabilities.

For hitters, LINWGT is defined as follows:

(.47 x B1) + (.78 x B2) + (1.09 x B3) + (1.40 x HR) + 
(.33 x (BB+HBP) ) + (.30 x SB) - (.60 x CS) - (.27 x OUTS)

For pitchers, LINWGT is defined as:

[ (.47 x B1) + (.78 x B2) + (1.09 x B3) + (1.40 x HR) +
  (.33 x (BB+HB+WP+BK+E) ) - (.27 x (IP x 3) ) ] x -1.

Multiplying the result by -1 for pitchers creates an index where higher values are better for all players.  Linear weights is a very important player evaluation index in simulation competitions such as DiamondMind and APBA, and it is also a useful diagnostic stat in fantasy and rotisserie leagues.

LINWGT (same as Linear Weights):  See previous definition.


Major League Equivalent (also MLE):  A construct popularized by Bill James and subsequently developed further by other statisticians.   Essentially, the statistics for minor league players are "graded on a curve" and converted to values that estimate what they would have been at the MLB level.  Adjustments are typically made for the level of play (AA or AAA), the type of league (e.g., is it hitter-friendly like the PCL), and the player's age.  MLEs are better than raw stats for evaluating the performance of minor leaguers.

MLE (same as Major League Equivalent):  See previous definition.


OBP (also On-base Percentage): Defined as (H+BB+HBP) divided by (AB+BB+HBP).  Improves on batting average as an index of offensive potential by taking walks and HBP into account.  Essentially, OBP indicates the percentage of trips to the plate in which the hitter reached base safely.  At the MLB level, values of .350 are above-average, and values of .400+ are outstanding.  Conversely, values hovering around .300 (+/- .020) are below average.  OBP is a key diagnostic stat for hitters generally, and an extremely important ability for top-of-the-order hitters.

On-base Percentage (same as OBP):  See previous definition.

Opponent's Batting Average (also OPPBA):   Can be estimated from readily-available stats by calculating [Hits Allowed divided by ((IP x 2.8) + Hits Allowed)].  The best MLB pitchers will have values of less than .250, while ineffective MLB pitchers will have values approaching or exceeding .300.

OPS (also Production):  Defined as OBP + SLUG.  A simple but effective index of offensive performance.  Considered a key diagnostic stat for hitters because it combines two core elements of offensive output (i.e., getting on base and advancing runners via extra-base hits).  At the MLB level, OPS values of .950+ are outstanding; values of .850-.950 are very good; and values of .750-.850 are average or better.  Position must be taken into account, of course, when applying these rules-of-thumb.  An "average" value for corner infielders or corner outfielders would be substantially higher than an "average" value for middle infielders or catchers.


Performance Lag (also LAG):  An index that reflects the gap (i.e., lag) between a player's expected statistical output and his actual statistical output.  The lag can occur for many reasons, but some of the more common reasons are lack of playing time, injury, and late-call-ups.  High LAG ratings essentially mean "This player should be putting up better stats in my scoring categories than he is currently putting up", and they are therefore an excellent way of identifying "sleepers" for draft purposes or free agent bids.  Players who have solid batting averages and good on-base ability but, at the same time, below-average HR and/or SB output also tend to get good LAG rankings.  These players make excellent end-game and/or reserve picks because of their steady-but-unspectacular performance.

Power Index:   A variation of the LINWGT formula that is sometimes used to indicate a hitter's power potential.  It is defined as [ (.78 x B2) + (1.09 x B3) + (1.40 x HR) ]  divided by at-bats.

Production (same as OPS): Defined as OBP + SLUG.  A simple but effective index of offensive performance.  Considered a key diagnostic stat for hitters because it combines two core elements of offensive output (i.e., getting on base and advancing runners via extra-base hits).  At the MLB level, OPS values of .950+ are outstanding; values of .850-.950 are very good; and values of .750-.850 are average or better.  Position must be taken into account, of course, when applying these rules-of-thumb.  An "average" value for corner infielders or corner outfielders would be substantially higher than an "average" value for middle infielders or catchers.

PRORANK (also ProRank Index): Our proprietary statistical index of fantasy and rotisserie value.  This index is individually configured according to the scoring categories, roster characteristics, and eligibility rules within each league.  It therefore provides an extremely accurate estimate of player values in a specific competition.  Because of its customized nature, it is particularly helpful for owners who compete in leagues that don't use the standard 4 x 4 scoring categories.

Values of the ProRank Index are standardized across all players, so the statistic can be used to directly compare offensive players at different positions and also to compare hitters and pitchers.  General guidelines for interpreting the index are as follows:

      > 90 = Superstar Territory
    60-90 = Top 5% of all MLB Players
    40-60 = Among Top 15% of Players
    20-40 = Among Top 25% of Players
    10-20 = Above-average MLB Player
     0-10 = Average MLB Player
     < 00 = Below-average MLB Player

ProRank Index (same as PRORANK):  See previous definition.


Quality Starts (also QUALS):  Sometimes used for evaluating the performance of starting pitchers.  Defined as the number of starts in which the pitcher lasted 6 innings or more and allowed no more than 3 earned runs.   The statistic makes more sense as an evaluation tool if it is divided by the number of games started so that it represents a percentage measure, but this is typically not done.


R$ (also Roto$ or Rotisserie Dollar Value):  The assumed value of a player in fantasy and rotisserie leagues.  Used as a guide for bidding during preseason drafts and as a basis for comparison when evaluating trades.

Rotisserie dollar values are often calculated in terms of a player's performance in the traditional scoring categories used in 4 x 4 rotisserie competitions.   For hitters, the traditional categories are batting average, runs batted in, home runs, and stolen bases.  For pitchers, the traditional categories are earned run average, ratio (i.e., walks+hits per inning pitched), wins, and saves. 

A player's true dollar value can vary considerably across leagues.   Accurate calculation of dollar values depends on a number of factors including the number of teams in the league, the salary cap, the number of players able to be retained, roster and reserve-list limits, and the scoring categories used to determine standings in the league.  The scoring categories are particularly important, because they essentially define the types of players who are valuable and the types of players who are not.

ProRank provides league-specific rotisserie dollar values on all of its player lists.  These dollar values are extremely accurate because they are adjusted to reflect the characteristics of each competition.

RAR (also Runs Above Replacement):  RAR provides an estimate of the number of runs a hitter produces or a pitcher prevents above-and-beyond that of a "replacement-level" player. "Replacement-level" essentially means "average performance for a given position".  The position-specific character of RAR is somewhat unique and makes it a very good stat for evaluating players in simulation games like DiamondMind and APBA.   It is also a useful diagnostic index in fantasy and rotisserie play, because it can be used to make similar-scale comparisons between hitters and pitchers.

Ratio (also Baserunners-per-inning or WHIP): Walks + hits divided by the number of innings pitched. This is a traditional rotisserie scoring category.  Less than 1.25 is considered very good and more than 1.50 is considered very bad.  Values under 1.00 indicate that the pitcher has allowed fewer baserunners than innings pitched and are only achieved occasionally by elite MLB pitchers.

RC@G (also Runs Created Per Game):     "Created" by Bill James.  An estimate of the number of runs that would be produced in a nine inning game if every slot in the batting order was occupied by the player in question.  Calculated as a ratio with the numerator defined as (H + BB - CS) x  (Total bases + (.52 x SB)+(.26 x BB) ) divided by (AB + BB) and the denominator defined as (AB - H + CS) divided by 25.5.  The resulting values are typically less than 10, with higher values indicating better performance.

Rotisserie Dollar Value (also R$ or Roto$):   The assumed value of a player in fantasy and rotisserie leagues.  Used as a guide for bidding during preseason drafts and as a basis for comparison when evaluating trades.

Rotisserie dollar values are often calculated in terms of a player's performance in the traditional scoring categories used in 4 x 4 rotisserie competitions.   For hitters, the traditional categories are batting average, runs batted in, home runs, and stolen bases.  For pitchers, the traditional categories are earned run average, ratio (i.e., walks+hits per inning pitched), wins, and saves. 

A player's true dollar value can vary considerably across leagues.   Accurate calculation of dollar values depends on a number of factors including the number of teams in the league, the salary cap, the number of players able to be retained, roster and reserve-list limits, and the scoring categories used to determine standings in the league.  The scoring categories are particularly important, because they essentially define the types of players who are valuable and the types of players who are not.

ProRank provides league-specific rotisserie dollar values on all of its player lists.  These dollar values are extremely accurate because they are adjusted to reflect the characteristics of each competition.

Roto$ (same as R$ or Rotisserie Dollar Value):  See previous definition.

Runs Above Replacement (also RAR):  RAR provides an estimate of the number of runs a hitter produces or a pitcher prevents above-and-beyond that of a "replacement-level" player. "Replacement-level" essentially means "average performance for a given position".  The position-specific character of RAR is somewhat unique and makes it a very good stat for evaluating players in simulation games like DiamondMind and APBA.   It is also a useful diagnostic index in fantasy and rotisserie play, because it can be used to make similar-scale comparisons between hitters and pitchers.

Runs Created Per Game (also RC@G):  "Created" by Bill James.  An estimate of the number of runs that would be produced in a nine inning game if every slot in the batting order was occupied by the player in question.   Calculated as a ratio with the numerator defined as (H + BB - CS) x  (Total bases + (.52 x SB)+(.26 x BB) ) divided by (AB + BB) and the denominator defined as (AB - H + CS) divided by 25.5.  The resulting values are typically less than 10, with higher values indicating better performance.


SLUG (also Slugging Percentage):  Defined as [Singles + (2 x Doubles) + (3 x Triples) + (4 x HR) ] divided by at-bats.  A measure of total bases accumulated per at bat and traditionally used as the primary index of a hitter's power potential.  Although it has been criticized on a number of counts, it is a very useful diagnostic statistic when added to OBP (on-base percentage) to obtain OPS (Production).  When used as a stand-alone stat, the best MLB power hitters have SLUG values of .500+. Hitters who are "power-challenged" have values below .350.

Slugging Percentage (same as SLUG):   See previous definition.

Speed Index: Suggested by Bill James and developed further by Ron Shandler.  A measure of several offensive elements that reflect speed skills. The elements are SB frequency, SB efficiency, triples frequency, and runs scored per times on base.  Suggested by Bill James and developed further by Ron Shandler.  A measure of several offensive elements that reflect speed skills. The elements are SB frequency, SB efficiency, triples frequency, and runs scored per times on base. 

Strikeouts-per-game (also K@9): Defined as (strikeouts divided by innings pitched) x 9.  This is a measure of a pitcher's dominance over hitters and is a key diagnostic stat.  It is especially useful for evaluating relief pitchers and, in particular, closers.  The better MLB pitchers will have k@9 values of 6.0 or more, and good closer candidates usually have values above 8.0.

Strikeout-to-walk ratio (also K@BB):  Defined as strikeouts divided by walks allowed, this statistic measures a pitcher's ability to: (1) throw strikes and, at the same time, (2) keep hitters from getting the bat on the ball.  A key diagnostic stat for all pitchers but especially for SPs.  The best MLB pitchers have k@bb ratios over 3.00.  Pitchers with k@bb ratios below 1.00 walk more batters than they strike out and should be avoided on fantasy/rotisserie rosters.


Tools:   An index of raw skills that underlie and support statistical output.  Extremely important as a diagnostic statistic for both hitters and pitchers.  Contributing factors to the index for hitters include strike-zone judgement, on-base ability, power potential, and speed.   Contributing factors for pitchers include ability to throw strikes, ability to overpower and/or fool hitters, and ability to prevent extra-base hits.

ProRank provides a tools index for all players in its ranking lists, and these values are directly comparable for hitters and pitchers.  Players with high values on our tools index are "safer bets" to equal or exceed prior levels of performance than players with low values on this index.  If two players have similar rotisserie dollar values, we strongly recommend giving preference to the one with a better tools score.


Walks per Game (also BB@9):  Defined as (walks allowed divided by innings pitched) x 9.   This is an index of how much control a pitcher has. Values below 3.0 indicate very good control; values above 4.0 suggest problems with control.

WHIP (also  Baserunners-per-inning or Ratio): Walks + hits divided by the number of innings pitched. This is a traditional rotisserie scoring category.  Less than 1.25 is considered very good and more than 1.50 is considered very bad.  Values under 1.00 indicate that the pitcher has allowed fewer baserunners than innings pitched and are only achieved occasionally by elite MLB pitchers.

Player News
Probable SPs
Fantasy Forums
MLB Box Scores
Injuries :  AL   NL
Daily Transactions
Minor League Stats
Baseball Stats Index
Baseball Newspapers
 
Fathead Sports Wall Graphics
 
Baseball Headlines
Basketball News
Football News
Hockey News
Soccer News
Tennis News
Golf News

 

 

Fathead Street Grips!

 

 

Your photo blown up life size - Fathead Custom!

 

 

World Series Baseball Memorabilia

 

Baseball
Scouting
Player
Profiling
Fantasy
Rotisserie
Baseball
Gear
Books
Videos
Games
Software
Baseball
Posters
Baseball
News
Other
Sports
Site
Map
Sports Gear, Sports Memorabilia, Sports Equipment Sports Gear, Sports Memorabilia, Sports Equipment
Affiliates Program
Privacy Policy
Design and Content Copyright 1998-2014 by ProRank International
All rights reserved
Updated on 02.26.14
Baseball Auctions
Contact ProRank
Buy baseball tickets
at Tickets4sports:
Philadelphia Phillies Tickets Boston Red Sox Tickets St Louis Cardinals Tickets Detroit Tigers Tickets
Los Angeles Dodgers Tickets New York Yankees Tickets Arizona Diamondbacks Tickets Texas Rangers Tickets